Design for Real Life

Real life is complicated.

Even after we’ve tested all the important user flows and polished the edges in our app or site, people still stumble. Why? Because we’re humans, and because our products still have:

  1. Broken flows: transition points or interactions, like a form on a site, that aren’t working correctly.
  2. Content gaps: someone needs a specific piece of content, but you don’t have it—or it’s not in the right place at the right time.
  3. Pain points: people get hung up and are likely to abandon the site or app.

Making digital products friendly isn’t enough to make them feel human.

For more on this topic, I highly recommend Design for Real Life from A Book Apart; the ebook is only $11.

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Instead of treating stress situations as edge cases, it’s time we move them to the center of our conversations—to start with our most vulnerable, distracted, and stressed-out users, and then work our way outward.

The reasoning is simple: when we make things for people at their worst, they’ll work that much better when people are at their best.

Order Design for Real Life from abookapart.com. See also the WordPress.org Flow glossary for terms inspired by this book that we use in testing WordPress.

Operation Homecooked Mobile Device Lab

Tucson-based web developer nerd Daniel Bishop wanted to test sites on multiple devices at once. So, he built a thing to do that. Awesomesauce.

Building Themes With the WP REST API

Building themes with the WP REST API — must-watch recap (with video) of Jack Lenox’s presentation at WordCamp London.

Davide Casali: Gestalt Design Principles for Developers

Video on WordPress.tv, highly recommended. My colleague Davide “Folletto” Casali shares basic design and user interaction fundamentals. (Slides.)

Flags Are Not For Languages

Why flags do not represent languages. A blog about designing global user experiences: beyond language, location & culture.

Via Dominik Schilling.

Testing for Web Accessibility in 60 Seconds

You want to make your website more accessible, but you don’t know where to start. David Kennedy can help.

Responsive Footnotes

harvard-footnotes

I love web design like this. Both beautiful and useful: footnotes in context so you can read and return without leaving your current place in the text. Two examples—that work in desktop down to mobile—from Upstatement: NPR Code Switch and the newly redesigned Harvard Law Review.

Hat tip: Jack Lenox.