Scott Stancil: Effective Bug Discovery and Management (WordCamp DC 2017)

If you’re on the East Coast and love WordPress, here’s a great chance to catch my Automattic colleague Scott Stancil speaking live about our work on Flow Patrol for WordPress.com — this Friday July 14, 2017 at 2:15 PM Eastern.

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Details on the WordCamp DC 2017 website. Learn more about what “flow patrol” is here on Make WordPress testing.

Design Success Ladder: Meaningful Products

Via design.org: The UX Design Success Ladder: Achieving Meaningful Product Design.

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Product success envisioned as rungs of a ladder, that you climb up from the bottom: functional, usable, comfortable, delightful, meaningful.

I first heard this concept last year at WordCamp Phoenix in a presentation by Ward Andrews; the article showcase examples of products or services at each level.

Takeaway message: don’t stop at functional and usable. Set the bar higher.

The Bias of the Absent Visitor

If your software product’s user interface doesn’t support _____, or support them well — your data won’t include _____ in your access logs. You could think they don’t visit often enough to include them in your team’s decisions about the interface. Instead, you can focus on segments of the population based on device, browser, OS, language and location, or any other criteria you feel are important and worthy of attention. It’s simple: make it work for the majority.

This is a blind spot. I call it the bias of the absent visitor. Since they’ve never come by, you can easily fall into assuming they don’t want to or need to use your interface. You might think you can just ignore them safely.

The reality is that they might have stopped by once or many times, had a terrible and unwelcome first experience, and have never come back. They could have seen a blank, white page instead of your carefully crafted design and content. Might have even told their friends not to bother.

This is one of my biggest blind spots. I hope that writing it down will motivate me to remember that the absent visitor is just as valuable as the typical one.

Design for Real Life

Real life is complicated.

Even after we’ve tested all the important user flows and polished the edges in our app or site, people still stumble. Why? Because we’re humans, and because our products still have:

  1. Broken flows: transition points or interactions, like a form on a site, that aren’t working correctly.
  2. Content gaps: someone needs a specific piece of content, but you don’t have it—or it’s not in the right place at the right time.
  3. Pain points: people get hung up and are likely to abandon the site or app.

Making digital products friendly isn’t enough to make them feel human.

For more on this topic, I highly recommend Design for Real Life from A Book Apart; the ebook is only $11.

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Instead of treating stress situations as edge cases, it’s time we move them to the center of our conversations—to start with our most vulnerable, distracted, and stressed-out users, and then work our way outward.

The reasoning is simple: when we make things for people at their worst, they’ll work that much better when people are at their best.

Order Design for Real Life from abookapart.com. See also the WordPress.org Flow glossary for terms inspired by this book that we use in testing WordPress.

WordPress.com Automated Tests Now Open Source — WatirMelon

I am very pleased to announce that all of our e2e tests for the WordPress.com platform are open source as of this morning. This is following in the footsteps of the WordPress.com Calypso front-end which is also open source. I am continually reminded of how fortunate I am to work at Automattic who takes pride in its commitment […]

via WordPress.com e2e Automated Tests Now Open Source — WatirMelon

Pride and Paradev

A book review for Pride and Paradev by Alister Scott.

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This is an entertaining and thought-provoking “collection of agile software testing contradictions”—exactly what it says on the tin.

After reading this book, I now identify confidently as a paradev: anyone on a software team that isn’t a specialist. Ever since my start in web development 12 years ago I’ve considered myself a generalist rather than a “pure” developer or designer because I don’t spend all my time building or creating new things. Software testing is an excellent fit for me because I love breaking things, finding details to make existing products better through improved flow and efficiency.

Using a quirky yet concise question-and-answer format, Scott covers such topics as “Are software testers the gatekeepers or guardians of quality?” (Yes, you can be an advocate of quality without being a gatekeeper; it all depends on your attitude, your tone, and how you present your findings.) and “Should acceptance criteria be implicit or explicit?” (Keep acceptance criteria focused on what is required, not what is obvious.) and “Do agile software testers need technical skills?” (Sometimes non-technical testers without the deep skill set see things with better eyes.)

This short and approachable book will make you think critically about software testing. Highly recommended for anyone working with software, not just us breakers.

[Available on Leanpub for iPad/Kindle/PDF.]

A Brand New Approach to WordPress

What would we build if we were starting from scratch today, knowing all we’ve learned over the past 13 years of building WordPress?

Matt today officially announced the new WordPress.com: Dance to Calypso.

Today we’re announcing something brand new, a new approach to WordPress, and open sourcing the code behind it. The project, codenamed Calypso, is the culmination of more than 20 months of work by dozens of the most talented engineers and designers I’ve had the pleasure of working with (127 contributors with over 26,000 commits!).

I’m incredibly proud to be part of this effort. API-driven, JavaScript-based, responsive design, and now open source.

More coverage: